Student and professional choreographers collaborated on the third concert of the fall semester at UNLV’s Dance Studio One on Nov. 18, 19 and 20.

“Kinetic Connections,” the name of the show, demonstrated the seemingly never-ending stream of abstract, movement-related concert names that the dance department is capable of generating. The pieces themselves, however, showcased a depth of thought on the part of the choreographers.

Guest artists Lawrence Jackson and Lynn Neuman added a professional breadth to the work of the students, but much of what the new choreographers set could have stood on its own anyway.

Jackson's "Exurgency"

Jackson’s “Exurgency” kicked off the show in purple-hued style, juxtaposing calm and precise steps with complex and busy staging. The space in the choreography left room for the dancers to connect with each other, creating a pleasant kind of tension and reality in the transitions. The movement itself was linear, modern-based and prone to canons and it was evident that the piece had been well-rehearsed.

Silence, quickly followed by a track redolent with piano and ambient noise, followed the first number. Jaleesa Staten’s “Hounded,” a pas de quatre, was cloaked in a wandering, baleful guise. The periodic stillness offset more frenetic sections and fierce extensions punctuated the piece. By the end,  the four girls had disrobed down to nude underwear and three were sitting against the far-upstage wall. One girl was left downstage and alone, filling the space with sadness amidst the sound.

Julia Peterson’s “The Strength to Be” was a fresh, industrial-feeling hip-hop piece with syrupy syncopation and strong accents. Ballet technique was evident and the diversity from both the dancers and the choreographer was welcome. The stone faces were an interesting detail, however. In a piece devoted to the strength of individuals, a more direct connection with the audience (indeed, a congregate of individuals), was strangely missing.

Sherer's "Sudden.Anxious.Flood"

“Sudden.Anxious.Flood.,” by Sandra Sherer, lived up to its name. The choreography was cyclic and desperate-feeling, exemplified by dancers rocking nervously and scrambling with abandon. The feverish, nightmare-like soundtrack completed the motif.

Neumann’s piece, explained briefly in the program, was a sort of tribute to Leo Baekeland and, perhaps more importantly, to the substance he invented: plastic. The piece was appropriately titled “Baeke’s Land” and was built around  the laying down of neon tape. The dancers, each attired in what can only be described as the worst of the leavings of the 1980s, executed the pleasantly cacophonous choreography well. The steps were contemporary and almost lyrical  and a section of contact improvisation seemed a fitting tribute to decades past.

Wilkerson's "With Love in Love"

Perhaps the most pedestrian story was displayed in “With Love in Love,” by Ashley Wilkerson. The music was reminiscint of a vintage Disney movie and the sweetheart characters matched perfectly. The straightforward narrative, with its unabashed entertainment value, was a respite from some of the more abstract pieces. Dancers Rachael Hayner and RJ Hughes did well with the choreography, although establishing a connection with the audience seemed to be a challenge at times. More expressive faces could have cleared up somewhat ambiguous scenarios throughout the piece.

UNLV’s emphasis on modern-based technique was evident in Jennie Carroll’s “Unlimited,” accompanied by deep acoustic guitar. The clear, linear movment contrastd with the fragmented and multifaceted nature of the piece, leading to a visual complexity that seemed to fit the title.

“A Jar of Broken Pieces,” choreographed by Emily Miller, was a percussive and pleading piece exemplified by the intense reds in the four girls’ flouncing tutus. The sweeping aggressivnes and shorter length made it more audience-accessible and the movement was well suited to the group of dancers.

Anna Fazio’s “Society” surged forward from the beginning. The start of the piece had a dark vibe to it and the choreographic progression of the dancers, often with oen following closely behind the other, could have symbolized an evolution of sorts. The frenzied running seemed to be further commentary. Either way, the eye contact between both the dancers themselves and the dancers and the audience was excellent and engaging.

Michael Coleman's "As the Last Petal Falls"

Michael Coleman’s “As the Last Petal Falls” brough a sense of calm to the stage. The choreography was busy, occasionally overly so, but the transitions of quiet walking lent some visual white space. Ballet technique was evident in attitudes and coupes and the movie-score-like track only added to this.

“Lonely Fire,” choreographed by Tiffany Caudullo and the only solo in the show, was a low and sultry number. The choreography was well executed, although there were perhaps a few too many still spaces for a potentially dynamic piece. The floor-centered movement was inventive, however, which mitigated this considerably.

Jessica Coleman's "V-XVII-MCMLXXXIII"

“V-XVI-MCMLXXXIII,” (yes, that is the title of a piece) was choreographed by Jessica Coleman and closed the show with musings about the nature of time. Ticking in the track was soon interrupted by a disruptive beat and the dancers became the cogs of a clock with many, many hands. The piece was engrossing in its complexity and the alarm bell that ended the number was fittingly jarring.

Time also ticked away steadily throughout the nearly two-hour concert. However, the variety of ideas in each piece made the show more entertaining than it was elongated. Big ideas are coming out of the small theater at UNLV.